Handspun Adventures 07/31/2014 Editions explained and moving the stash to its new home

Everytime I spin something new, I will make a handspun adventure post. Some posts will be “an edition” as they are part of a certain collection, or from the same vendor, or same prep, or maybe a club. When I find something I adore, I’ve ended up collecting quite a few. To give examples of said collections, there will be Namaste Farms Scrapbox Editions, Loop! bullseye bump editions, Corgihill Farms editions, Beesybee’s Bfl/seacell edition (I have a thing for the seacell and properties of fiber made of seaweed-which of course I will expand on in that post) etc etc.

Case in point there will be a loop bullseye bump edition
Case in point there will be a loop bullseye bump edition

Handspun adventures are just that, my experience, the fibers used (if I know, sometimes, it’s a complete mystery), the fibers prep. The method it was spun, to achieve desired effect.

This handspun was a new to me method, out of the book, The Spinners Book of Yarn Design by Sarah Anderson, with the method called the crepe chain ply. Fiber used was Politically Incorrect Fibers -std ball
This handspun was a new to me method, out of the book, The Spinners Book of Yarn Design by Sarah Anderson, with the method called the crepe chain ply. Fiber used was
Politically Incorrect Fibers -std ball

If it’s a longterm project, such as spinning a fleece for a sweater, these will all fall under handspun adventures, but to help clear things up, I will add “the edition”, as well as, the date.

My newest “handspun adventure” was, I recently moved, and my nicely put away stash, was revealed to me. I’ve amassed quite the amount. I insisted it be the last thing to be packed and leave, and the first thing to be unpacked at the new destination. I drove my spinning wheels one at a time, they always called “shotgun” and were given special treatment, as any life-force needing protection would in my car.

Ashford Country Spinner, who had called shotgun, buckled in safe for the road trip. Can you believe this wheel also in it's life traveled from Montana to Las Vegas, and when I took it from Las Vegas, it was dismantled and taken as a carry-on... Do you know the size of this wheel? This was no small feat
Ashford Country Spinner, who had called shotgun, buckled in safe for the road trip. Can you believe this wheel also in it’s life traveled from Montana to Las Vegas, and when I took it from Las Vegas, it was dismantled and taken as a carry-on… Do you know the size of this wheel? This was no small feat

Lol. Remember, these wheels get named. I love my stash dearly, so naturally, I would not let anyone else “haul” it to the new location, except myself.

I was heckled a little bit. I was asked, “was I afraid they’d break my wool?”

What can I say, the stash told me it wanted to ride with me. Don’t take it personal. So, that is exactly what happened, I packed, hauled and unloaded my stash and fiber tools with the utmost care, and made damn sure, none of my wool “was broken” in the move. It did however, make me acutely aware of how much stash I have. And umm, it’s definitely not all up in ravelry. It’s more than I expected, I will say this though…. The hidden stash, or rather, the stash that wasn’t where the normal stash was…. Well,  It fit in, where the rest of the stash was, no need for hidden stash locations and guess what.. There is still more room… Hee hee, that’s right, so I can tell you, I know I will get more, there is no denying it. Being I have space yet to be filled. Awesome, awesome news, for any fiberholic.

I would love to thank Judith Mackenzie McCuin for her tip on storing fleece in 5gallon buckets. Such an awesome tip!

Most of all, I’d love to thank my husband. He has a hobby as well… Music. Which he has quite the stash of his own, several guitars (a hundred million guitar picks), a few bass guitars, drums, electric keyboard, pedals, beat machine, recording unit thing. Whatever… I totally get it!!  The understanding why he needs 4 plus guitars, even though he can only play one at a time.? I soooo get it. They each have a different purpose, so he doesn’t question why I need several different wheels and spindles, fiber tools, fibers, they do different things. I’m fortunate he has a passion, much like myself. He built me handspun and bobbin wall display/holders. That happened to clear up a lot of fiber stash storage. Allowing me to store resting/waiting bobbins, and to display finished handspun, probably clearing up the most space in my stash storage.

Hubby building me bobbin and handspun wall unit - he is the best. Wait until you see all the other fiber tools he has made me
Hubby building me bobbin and handspun wall unit – he is the best. Wait until you see all the other fiber tools he has made

Its a a perfect match. Him and I and our passion for our hobbies. Music and fiber are a match made in heaven. Everything was moved safely, and we are making the most of our new home and the space we have. Although, this handspun adventure was of a different kind, it was an experience that needed to be documented.

Very soon I will be posting another handspun adventure… Of the edition kind. My first Scrapbox.

Wool nepps tutorial – How to make them yourself

My wool nepps are the first 3, on the tape measure. The 4th is generally what is available online for purchase.
My wool nepps are the first 3, on the tape measure.
The 4th wool nepp, is generally what is available online for purchase.
Wool nepps a tutorial, well, a curly wool nepp. It’s a start, and just my style, easy and cute

I have searched the web far and wide about how to make wool nepps on my own. I’ve seen, where to but them how to use them, but…

I can’t seem to find a tutorial, on how to make my own wool nepps. So after my hydrogen peroxide trial went so well, it gave me an idea for another experiment.

Wool nepps are considered a by product, waste, second cuts. Naturally, the fiber folks are smart people and took those little bits of waste and made them a fun add in. I think where fiber is concerned, we find ways to ascertain nothing is wasted. Again, everything has it’s place, and these nepps become these cute, tiny wool sprinkles, by dying them bright colors, and adding to artisan batts or yarns. Maybe needle felt eyes on a toy, etc,… No waste!!

Cleaned lock with dirty tips...
Cleaned Corriedale lock with dirty tips…
I had washed a fleece, it was clean but a few locks had the tips stuck together by dirt. This time, I was undeniably, too lazy to wait for locks to take a swim in the hydrogen peroxide, and then dry. Instead, I decided to clip the dirty tip off as I spun, instantly opening up the lock for spinning. Fibers are all aligned in these locks, since they are grown side by side. That dirty tip being clipped off and gone, the lock opens up instantly, without any flicking, and ready for instant, top-like spinning.

Clip dirty tips off clean locks, and add into a tub until you have filled the tub enough to make it worth the next step... Or maybe until you are out of dirty tips
Clip dirty tips off clean locks, and add into a tub until you have filled the tub enough to make it worth the next step… Or maybe until you are out of dirty tips
I started saving my clipped tip pieces in a tub and once I had a good amount, I thought these, yes, these could be nepps.

The picture shows my little clipped lock tips next to the bright white lock it was clipped from, for reference. They were dirty, and unwelcome in my white yarn. We know how to clean these clippings effortlessly, no problem, with that hydrogen peroxide soak.

My pile of dirty tips ready for a soak, next to the white locks I'm left with
My pile of dirty tips ready for a soak, next to the white locks I’m left with
First things first, I plopped them into my hydrogen peroxide to melt off the dirt as I learned(see earlier blog here)

https://everythingfiberarts.com/2014/06/15/stain-removal-from-my-lovely-locks/

and let the magic happen, after the 24 hours were up…

Tips in hydrogen peroxide soak for 24 hours
Tips in hydrogen peroxide soak for 24 hours
I emptied the container and rinsed my little pieces of wool, in some room temp/cool water, and set them on the rack to dry.

After drying I was left with mini curl nepps - dime for size reference
After drying I was left with mini curl nepps – dime for size reference
They turned out to be mini curls, little white tips and I must say, I think they are cute as ever, not the nepp ball I’m used to seeing but an awesome add in, so next up, a quick dye job, when dying other fleece . No extra steps to dye when I’m already doing a batch of dying something and BAM!

Curly nepps
Curly nepps
I have a new add in that otherwise would have been waste, it doesn’t look exactly like a nepp ball, but I must say, just as cute, if not cuter, then the usual round balls on the market.
I adore the little curl.

Left - nepps purchased online But from the royal blue, Kelly green, and chartreuse are all mine :)
Left – nepps purchased online
But from the royal blue, Kelly green, and chartreuse are all mine 🙂
Next time you are spinning by the lock, if you don’t want to wait for the hydrogen peroxide method, maybe try clipping that tip off, and saving them until you have a good amount, do the easy soak, rinse, dry, and dye (unless white is good for the project, leave as is)

Homemade nepps, the curls are darling! if I do say so myself
Homemade nepps, the curls are darling!
if I do say so myself (again nepps to the left were online purchase)
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This is as close to a nepp as I got with minimal, very minimal work. It actually, saved time snipping the lock tip as I spun and saving up my dirty tips for future nepps, I gotta say I’m pretty pleased with myself. The hydrogen peroxide bath really isn’t work. Not quite the nepp balls that can be bought, but tiny sprinkled curls, still cute.
I bet I could run them through the dryer wet and have balls, but that’s more work then I want to put into my nepps, however, I have to say I really do like the curls I got. Although, I suspect, results will vary depending on fleece type, and how fine/coarse curly/crimpy the fiber is you try this with. All in all, should I end up with dirty tips from any fleece, they will now be trimmed for future nepp styles, colors, really the possibilities are endless…

I think they turned out awesome for a first try, again super easy... And no wasted wool
I think they turned out awesome for a first try, again super easy… And no wasted wool
I suppose I will have to show them in an art batt or maybe even some finished handspun! 🙂

what do you think? Will you ever give this a try? Make your own wool nepps and save a little wool, that’d otherwise be trashed.

Handspun Adventures 6/26/2014 Neon Sunset special

Neon sunset polworth silk with teeswater curl add ins 214 yards of happy
Neon sunset polworth silk with teeswater curl add ins
214 yards of happy
This handspun is made with Blue Barn Fibers polworth/silk rolags in the neon sunset colorway. With teeswater curl add ins, also from Blue Barn Fiber, in the neon sunset colorway.

I did end up with some barberpoling while plying, however, when woven or knit up I think the barberpoling will help the transition when moving from one color to the next. It is actually pretty finely spun pre soak, which came out to a 13-14WPI off the wheel.

Pre soak 13-14 WPI
Pre soak 13-14 WPI
Polworth has an amazing way of poofing up after a soak and set.

Drying in the sun - that luster in that lock in the middle is indicative of why I love an amazing teeswater... Teeswater top vs teeswater locks, is a completely different experience. I prefer the lock, for sure.
Drying in the sun – that luster in that lock in the middle is indicative of why I love an amazing teeswater… Teeswater top vs teeswater locks, is a completely different experience. I prefer the lock, for sure.
Which ended me up with a 10-12WPI yarn, stuffed consistently with the teeswater locks throughout.

post soak 10-12 WPI that polworth really fluffs
post soak 10-12 WPI that polworth really fluffs
I left a long beginning and end to the yarn without any locks. Ultimately, the idea of a thinly woven scarf is what I have in mind for this very special yarn.

I love how the colors are so incredibly bright. The purple melts into pinks, into neon peaches once mixed with the tangerine orange, and finally into a bright happy yellow. The way I chose to spin one rolag to the next, matching up the rolags colors, end to end, giving it longer color repeats. I see it being the perfect weft. I ended up with approx 214yards with 2oz of the rolags, and 1oz of teeswater, which didn’t play a part in the yardage the way it was used.

On the niddy noddy
On the niddy noddy
214 yards is quite a bit to work with…

It’s serendipitous the day I finished this handspun, is the day I get notified that my loom is shipping. What are the odds, that as I’m winding this yarn on my niddy noddy, after months of spinning it, is exactly when I find out my Schacht Flip loom is on it’s way? (The loom was ordered from schacht before my birthday may 10th, and an month and a half later it’s on it’s way)
I’ll need to practice a little on the loom prior to using such a special yarn, which is fine, as this will give me time to think about a warp.

For now, neon sunset special is going to decorate my handspun wall.

imageimage

Every time I see it’s bright happy colors, with the matching perfect curls, it just makes me happy, just being yarn, so I’m not in any rush…. Well, not until I have that perfect warp figured out.